Pro Tools 10 Tutorials: New Features of Pro Tools 10–Clip-based Gain

On October 21, 2011, in Music Technology, ProTools Tutorials, by Daniel Rowland

Pro Tools 10 New Features: Clip-based gain. One of the best new features in Pro Tools 10 is real-time clip based gain. This affects the normal Pro Tools workflow in several ways. For one, Regions are now referred to as “Clips”. Audio clips can have their individual gain adjusted separate from the track fader position […]

Pro Tools 10 New Features: Clip-based gain.

One of the best new features in Pro Tools 10 is real-time clip based gain. This affects the normal Pro Tools workflow in several ways. For one, Regions are now referred to as “Clips”.

Audio clips can have their individual gain adjusted separate from the track fader position and without using the standard solution of the Audiosuite gain plugin. Like many region (now clip!) properties, you must show this ” Clip Gain Info”  from the View menu.

 

 

 

 

 

Simply click on the lower left portion of the region and you’ll see a small fader for adjusting gain. The gain changes and waveform redraw happen in real-time–no waiting.

 

 

 

 

 

The new Pro Tools 10 keyboard shortcut Shift + Control + up/down arrow will nudge the clip gain up or down by an amount set in the Preferences for Editing–the default is .5 db.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just as you can show the Clip Gain info on the bottom of each audio clip, you can show the Clip Gain Line–a volume envelope–on each region. This is also accessed in Pro Tools 10 from the View menu>Clip.

 

 

 

 

 

Again, this is separate from the track volume, and has breakpoints, just as other automation envelopes in Pro Tools.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been hoping for this feature for a long time. Pro Tools is one of last of the major DAWs to incorporate clip-based gain. It really does make editing and mixing much easier, without having to write track automation or print Audiosuite effects. Stay tuned for more new feature of Pro Tools 10!

Reason 6!

On October 17, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Daniel Rowland

What’s new in Reason: Reason 6 released. It hasn’t been all that long since Propellerhead released their Record DAW to complement their flagship product, Reason. For those of you that don’t now, Reason is a virtual rack of synthesizers, effects, and signal routing processors, combined with a MIDI sequencer. It’s been around since 2000, following the […]

What’s new in Reason: Reason 6 released.

It hasn’t been all that long since Propellerhead released their Record DAW to complement their flagship product, Reason. For those of you that don’t now, Reason is a virtual rack of synthesizers, effects, and signal routing processors, combined with a MIDI sequencer. It’s been around since 2000, following the products Recycle and Rebirth. One limitation of Reason is that it has never been able to record audio to tracks. As of Reason 5, sampling instruments could record and edit audio, but you couldn’t, for instance, create an audio track and record, edit, and comp vocals in it.

It’s been a long time since Propellerhead released any new pieces of software, outside of updates for Reason. Record changed that. Record was designed to emulate the signal flow of an analog console (loosely based around SSL architecture), along with the benefits of digital recording/editing, such as comping. It included Line 6 guitar and bass amp modeling capabilities, timestretching, and Neptune, a pitch correction/voice synth addon.

  “SSL style mixer/bus compressor”

It was Propellerhead’s version of a DAW, marketed for “musicians” as opposed to “stuffy engineers”. Reason intergrated with Record (marketed as “Duo”) for a pretty robust audio, MIDI, and synthesis platform, that still managed to be simple to use.

With the release of Reason 5 (and its ability to record audio), I started wondering when they would just integrate the two programs into one. That is the case with Reason 6. Record is no more. Reason now has the power of both programs. It comes with a higher price tag, but is finally an “all-in-in” solution for home studios. There are also 3 new devices:

The Echo (stereo echo…that you can actually play!),

Pulveriser (parallel processing unit for compression/distortion)

and Alligator (pattern-based gate effect). You can upgrade for under $200, or buy the whole thing for under $400.

For more info on what’s new in Reason 6, click here.

 

 

Avid Pro Tools 10 Release

On October 7, 2011, in Music Technology, ProTools Tutorials, by Daniel Rowland

Pro Tools 10 (?). You know it’s coming. Yes, Pro Tools 9 had a few cool features, but it was really more about unlocking previously withheld features that it was about giving us anything new and exciting. Support for Coreaudio was the big one, the rest being things like multitrack Beat Detective, delay compensation, increased […]

Pro Tools 10 (?).

You know it’s coming. Yes, Pro Tools 9 had a few cool features, but it was really more about unlocking previously withheld features that it was about giving us anything new and exciting. Support for Coreaudio was the big one, the rest being things like multitrack Beat Detective, delay compensation, increased voice count, mp3  bounce, etc. The other big thing about Pro Tools 9 was that is was the official rebranding of Pro Tools as an Avid product, as opposed to Digidesign.

So that brings us to Pro Tools 10. It’s no surprise that the turnaround between Pro Tools 9 and Pro Tools 10 is going to be fairly short. I’m wondering if this well be unveiled at AES New York at the end of October–though I have a feeling it may not be announced until early next year. The video below gives some interesting insights into new features. These include:

– Dynamic clip based gain (finally!)

– Loading sessions into RAM for faster performance

– Real-time fades

– Avid ISIS Support (streaming of shared storage)


In addition, there’s been plenty of speculation about other new features, from 64 bit support (undoubtedly), to a much needed freeze tracks feature, to offline bounce, to track folders, and more. 

As always, I’ll wait to get the update a few months after it actually comes out. I prefer to let others work out the bugs in .0 software, while I actually get stuff done. 😉 

 

 

Steve Jobs Dead

On October 6, 2011, in Uncategorized, by Daniel Rowland

Not much of a post here guys…Just a had to chime in on the death of Steve Jobs… lamenting the loss of a true genius in the world of computers and marketing. Love him or hate him (I don’t)–you’ve got to respect him. 56 is crazy young. Sail on, Steve Jobs

Not much of a post here guys…Just a had to chime in on the death of Steve Jobs… lamenting the loss of a true genius in the world of computers and marketing. Love him or hate him (I don’t)–you’ve got to respect him. 56 is crazy young.
Sail on, Steve Jobs

New features of Pro Tools 9!

On November 4, 2010, in Uncategorized, by Daniel Rowland

Today, Avid release Pro Tools 9. Yep, it lets you work with third party audio interfaces. Read that again. And, you can use the software with your Mac or PC internal sound card. To be honest, I didn’t think this would actually happen. Now, that’s pretty cool, but ADC is just as important. Finally, Pro […]

Today, Avid release Pro Tools 9. Yep, it lets you work with third party audio interfaces. Read that again. And, you can use the software with your Mac or PC internal sound card. To be honest, I didn’t think this would actually happen.

Now, that’s pretty cool, but ADC is just as important. Finally, Pro Tools comes with Automatic Delay Compensation. Be happy.

More tracks, OMF support, timecode, and more. I’m impressed…and for $249 your can crossgrade from Pro Tools LE. Buy it new for $599.

This is pretty cool. Now, I’m not sure why the hell most people would want to run Pro Tools HD, when there’s new Pro Tools (no longer called LE or Mpowered). For the seemingly small array of extra features that HD offers, you can upgrade Pro Tools to the full HD with the Complete Production Toolkit. Stay tuned for more! For live, interactive Pro Tools 9 classes, visit TheOnlineAudioSchool main page.

Check out Avid’s website for more info!

Pro Tools HD HEAT Listening Challenge

On October 27, 2010, in Music Technology, ProTools Tutorials, Uncategorized, by Daniel Rowland

So as you may (or may not) have heard, Pro Tools HD has a new extension called HEAT, developed by Cranesong founder Dave Hill. Billed as “Analog Warmth and Color Emulation for Pro Tools|HD”, it’s designed to model some of the beneficial characteristics of using a analog signal path. I’ve presented my classes with some […]

So as you may (or may not) have heard, Pro Tools HD has a new extension called HEAT, developed by Cranesong founder Dave Hill. Billed as “Analog Warmth and Color Emulation for Pro Tools|HD”, it’s designed to model some of the beneficial characteristics of using a analog signal path. I’ve presented my classes with some examples of this, with mixed reactions. Now, you can download some example files and take a blind listening test as to which is a Pro Tools HD mix, an HD mix with Heat, and a mix summed through a Neve console.

Take the Pro Tools HEAT Listening Challenge here.